Anemia of Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a disease in which the kidneys slowly lose their ability to function.  At the start of the disease, most people do not have any symptoms, which is why sometimes people are unaware that they have CKD.  The two most common causes of CKD are diabetes and high blood pressure. Worsening of kidney disease can lead to many health problems and can increase the chances of getting diseases of the heart and blood vessels. If not treated on time, CDK can lead to kidney failure. 

Chronic kidney disease can lead to anemia, which is a condition in which the body makes fewer red blood cells than normal. Red blood cells are important because they carry oxygen throughout the body. Many people with CDK will eventually develop anemia. This is because kidneys make an important hormone called erythropoietin, or EPO. EPO tells your body to make red blood cells. When kidneys are damaged, they don’t have enough EPO. As a result, the bone marrow makes fewer red blood cells, causing anemia and depriving the body of the oxygen it needs. 

Clinical research is currently being conducted to help find potential treatment options for people with anemia associated with chronic kidney disease. Bluewater Clinical Research Group is proud to help contribute to this research and are actively looking for individuals with anemia in conjunction with kidney disease.

To find out more, or see if you may qualify, please provide us with your contact information and one of our enrollment facilitators will be happy to get in touch with you. As everyone has different schedules, we may even text you to set up a good time to talk.

Clinical research studies can have varying criteria to participate in them. We will be contacting you to discuss the inclusion and exclusion criteria for this study to help us determine if you qualify and if the study may be a good fit for you.

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